About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the palestinian leadership on the west bank, and in egypt, i think that could result in something. we'll see if she can help break this logjam. they were close but they're not there until they're there. >> she used an interesting phrase. she described the situation as requiring deescalation rather than cease-fire. what did she mean by that? >> right. i think they're talking about having some sort of period of what the palestinians call calm or what the israelis want to test to see what the hamas militants in gaza are up to. they're not ready to call it a formal cease-fire and remember, the u.s., israel, the europeans, for that matter, they don't recognize hamas. they regard hamas as a terrorist organization so it's awkward. they can't deal directly with one of the principal players in this part of the world, hamas, which controls gaza. it's up to countries like egypt or turkey or qatar to broker that kind of a deal because they have good relations with hamas. so it's an awkward situation and there's no trust, totally no trust from hamas towards the israelis and certainly no trust from the is
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
. by the way, they now have a common border with egypt. they can send people and we don't think there is any shortage of food, any other human needs. we are open to that they can move. it's only against arms and they can ship, they can come, they can go and they can stop. we cannot stop. it's one-sided. that's the problem. we left gaza willingly. nobody forced us. and we are aware that gaza is densely populated. it doesn't give us any pleasure whatsoever to see anybody in gaza suffering. what for? we want to regain peace with them. we don't hate them. we don't try to get any glories or any victorievictories. we want to live in peace. they can stop any suffering in one second. stop shooting and that's it. officials say we stop shooting, it won't help. the order of 200, 300 missiles a day, one-sided, their initiative. look, i am for fairness but to be fair when you have [ inaudible ], without a choice, you cannot equalize the two of them. >> if you believe, mr. president, that iran is behind a lot of the hamas terror activity, as you put it, then what action do you intend to take against iran?
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)